20 April 2012

28 Repeatless 0002: Noah Sateen v001

Title: Repeatless 0002: Noah Sateen v001
Size: 400px x 800px (snapshots of two runs shown)
Method: Processing
Two images (chosen at random from 11 files created in Photoshop) are placed in random positions in each row of a 20 column design, at least 8 cells apart. Each image cannot have another image in the same column below it for 5 subsequent rows or in the cells diagonally below it for 1 subsequent row.
It feels like I'm getting to grips with Processing now. After a wasted few hours trying to adapt the Ten Cell Sateen code to do this, I started again from scratch. Short term pain, long term gain. The new code uses functions, so the bit that loops is only a few lines long. I've used Arrays (rather than ArrayLists); there was a bit of code I had been using that I'd found on a forum - it worked, but I didn't undertand why and that annoyed me. This prompted me to find a different way of using Arrays, which has resulted in (hopefully) much better way of doing it (and one I fully understand). I'm trying to make the code as modular as possible, prompted by a discussion with my supervisory team.
The images that Photoshop chooses I created very quickly, really just to check everything was working. I'm really happy with the code, but when I starting this project I was determined that the designs I created would (as far as possible) look beautiful and not just be interesting. I don't thing the images above meet that criteria. There's a big sense of achievement in getting the code running as planned, but the content falls into the interesting-not-beautiful catagory. I'm pleased with it, but I doubt it would have much interest in a professional design context.
This highlights another area to explore - how the content is created. It could be made in advance (as with the above), generated by the code or a combination of the two. I'm interested in all of these; the first of the three could allow designers without coding knowledge to generate repeatless pattern.